Nat’l Library Week: The McPherson Room

Researching your family history?  Desperately trying to remember the last name of that old high school chum?  Devastatingly curious about the tunnels that supposedly exist under the streets of McPherson?

The McPherson Room is the place for you!  So much more than a stuffy room full of dusty books, The McPherson Room is a great place to find the answer to any number of questions you may have about McPherson County.

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You can access ancestry.com (free in-library use!) on the computer or use our genealogy books.  If your family is local, you can also check our obituary database and biography files.

Or you can grab one of the McPherson High School yearbooks to find an old classmate or laugh at your dad’s hairstyle when he graduated from Mac High. We have an almost comprehensive collection from 1943 on, plus a few earlier ones.

If you are looking for local history, there is no better place to search. In addition to our original collection, the Peterson family graciously donated Linn Peterson’s archive of newspaper clippings, early photographs, manuscripts, and other documents.  You can take a gander through some of the reference books, such as the pictorial history of McPherson compiled by the Sentinel, or you can ask the service staff for help searching through our vast cabinets of vertical files. The atlases of the young McPherson County and the Sanborn fire maps are also excellent resources.

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If you are interested in a specific time period, search through one of our newspaper microfilms!  We have microfilm of most of the county’s earliest newspapers, including ones from McPherson, Lindsborg (careful, the early ones are in Swedish), Moundridge, and more.

The McPherson Room is an amazing resource for anyone wanting to delve into local or family history.  Come check it out!

Oh, and as for the tunnels: they’re based in fact, but wildly exaggerated.  There were access tunnels running parallel to the streets so customers could enter basement businesses, but they didn’t go under any streets, nor were there tunnels connecting the Opera House to any hotels.  Sorry.

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